Birthday Celebrations at the Village Market……

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO US……….

Come and help us celebrate three successful years with a complimentary cup of tea or coffee and cake! 

Plus a free raffle and a chance to win a £20 voucher.

Saturday 12th July 10am – 12 noon at Otterhampton Village Hall.

Local Produce & Craft Stalls Homemade bread, cakes, savouries, sweets, jams and pickles. Fresh garden vegetables, plants, jewellery and assorted handmade gifts.

Did you make it to the OPRA Fete and Pig Roast?

Many thanks to all those of you who supported this weekend’s Fete and Pig Roast.  Whether you helped with the planning and preparation, donated things to sell, helped on the day by running a stall or even clearing up afterwards – small army was involved in making it happen and your efforts are very much appreciated.  Of course, a special thank you to all those who supported us by coming along on the day.

Take a look at all the pictures from the Fete

2014 fete 1

2014 fete 1

2014 fete 2

2014 fete 2

2014 fete 3

2014 fete 3

2014 fete 4

2014 fete 4

2014 fete 5

2014 fete 5

2014 fete 6

2014 fete 6

2014 fete 7

2014 fete 7

2014 fete 8

2014 fete 8

2014 fete 9

2014 fete 9

OPRA Fete & Pig Roast

2pm – 5pm Saturday 5th July – the Common Combwich

Come and enjoy a day out at the OPRA Combwich Fete with lots of things to do for all the family, including a display by the Nelson School of Dancing, the ever popular Dog Show, Bouncy Castle, Cuthbert the Clown, Face Painting, Skittles, Short Mat Bowls and many more activities and stalls. If you are in need of a drink there will be a licensed  bar, barbeque and cream teas are also available.

And in the evening at 7.30pm – The Pig Roast with Live Music at the Anchor. There will be a lucky ticket number draw and the Fete Raffle will be drawn with £100 going to the lucky winner and lots of other prizes will be drawn. Tickets Adults £10 under 18s with an adult £2 available from the Anchor and the Post Office

 

 

 

New Community Newsletter

We are examining the possibility of creating a new “Community Newsletter” for this parish to replace the existing Parish Council and OPRA newsletters which could be published on a quarterly or bi-monthly basis. We hope this can be a real community enterprise with space dedicated to all those organisations which contribute to the rich variety of our community life.

The format for such a publication will be decided by an editorial team yet to be established. If you are interested in playing any part in this venture, Continue reading

Bloomin’ marvellous

The wild flower meadow has made great progress this year and we have received many compliments. Next year will be even better…..these things take time.

This week we have made a pathway through the flowers and anyone is welcome to take a stroll through and enjoy it. We respectfully ask that you do not stray from the designated walkway or to let your children or dogs run through it.

There are many more flowers expected other than the prevalent pink and white you can see at the moment. Come and take time to look a little closer and you will see smaller species nearer to the ground.

If you have a little spare time you are very welcome to come and join our little team. Younger members would be especially welcome. Please contact our secretary John Bailey on 01278-652540 if you have any questions or would like to come and help us.

Wildflower meadow

Wildflower meadow

Wildflower path

Wildflower path

Wildflower poppy

Wildflower poppy

Wildflower sign

Wildflower sign

Centenary remembrance of the First World War

Where’s the sense in this, then?

When you read the following names, you might know where these places are: Beaumont Hamel, St. Pierre Divion, Delville Wood, Bazentin Le Petit, Pozières, High Wood? Anyway, they all lie on the high rolling chalk land in France known to us as the Somme, named after the river which meanders marshily on the hills’ south side.
At Thiepval, high above the tributary river Ancre, is a huge and unpretty structure, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. It is a memorial to seventy thousand (70,000) dead soldiers whose bodies were never found during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. Inconnu. Known only to God.
So I suppose that it would have been impossible to have created a neat, two minute TV/PR media event by having their bodies flown home from Iraq, to be greeted by a brass band, a draped union flag, a minor Royal and a few proud chests covered with medals. To point up this small absurdity is not an attempt to diminish the personal tragedies of families and friends. But today, political spin makes us voyeurs in a soap opera world, whose boundaries are an over-familiar rectangle.
Mankind’s capacity for profoundly idiotic behaviour seems bottomless, probably because we have no difficulty in discovering moral reasons for doing whatever we choose to do. We find ourselves accepting war with the simple proviso that it shall be successful, that our ability to invent even cleverer weapons will disguise the meaning of our actions from ourselves, permitting us, we hope and expect, to succeed with no casualties – at least for us. ‘Johnny comes marching home again – hurrah, hurrah!’
On the south-west edge of High Wood is a British military cemetery. Someone, in the very early nineteen-twenties, had written a despairing message in the Book of Remembrance there, and it wondered whether the nightingales would ever sing again in High Wood.
Perhaps you know that the Queen’s and South Staffs had first attacked High Wood on the evening of July 14th, 1916. After months of mayhem, the wood was taken and the way forward to Bapaume was open – or so they thought. But of High Wood there were only stumps, mud and a huge mine crater left, no more.
A lifetime later I sat there in the warm evening sunshine, leafing through the book. I could hear not one, but three nightingales singing in High Wood. The mine crater is a pond with ducks.

July ’03  JB